Survival?:: distinguish between opportunities and threats


Benoit Mandelbrot introduced us to the world of fractals and, low-and-behold, it transpires that, when it comes to dealing with complex systems such as the human body, the smaller the scale of our investigation the closer we get to the root cause of a problem. Our success-rate when it comes to dealing with diseases that, unseen, attack and erode the system from within, has increased exponentially.

Why, then, does the “business world” chose to ignore such lessons? Preferring instead to try to estimate what the future might hold based upon a fuzzy image of the present and a black & white image of the past. Our technology has evolved whilst much our thinking is mired in a, now past, era.

Whether you believe that business is war (and vice versa) or not you cannot help but be aware that it is the same in the Animal Kingdom as it is in business: those who would do you harm have evolved camouflage that enables them to merge into their surroundings and get as close to their intended victim as they can.

If your vision or other senses are impaired or the predator uses the environment to their advantage you are easy prey…THINK ABOUT IT AND ACT!!! Lose the blinkers.

Question what you know, how you know it, who you trust, their motives, the basis of their knowledge. If they can’t provide you with a High Definition image of that which you seek to observe, you may have been fooled their camouflage OR be sleepwalking toward oblivion with your only comfort being that you will be far from alone!

Ontonix don’t do sleepwalking: Rate-A-Business

How can you become a reframer and continuously practice mental model innovation? As Nooyi and Immelt did, you first need to change the lens through which you observe and interpret the business world — a world that’s getting increasingly complex. To use a metaphor from photography, you can’t capture nor appreciate the full richness and complexity of the physical world if you only take snapshots using a still camera with a fixed 2D lens — and do it only during the daytime. Rather, you need to train your mind to act as a sophisticated “mental camera”…

See Innovation Opportunities with an Upgraded Mental Camera – Navi Radjou, Jaideep Prabhu, Prasad Kaipa, Simone Ahuja – Harvard Business Review.

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