Beyond Data Mining:: knowledge mining


We live in the digital age. The flow of data is truly impressive. Statistics inform us that each year we generate more data than the past generations did in decades. But the problem is that Information Technology (IT) has concentrated on simply automating old ways of thinking, creating bottlenecks and problems we didn’t even imagine, and not really inventing new processes or approaches. There is little innovation going on in the IT arena. But one thing is certain, we are drowning in data and we’re thirsty for knowledge…

Turn data into structure

Structure is the overture to knowledge. But what is knowledge? What is a “body of knowledge”? Setting aside ontological hair-splitting  we could say that a body of knowledge is equivalent to a structured and dynamic set of inter-related rules. The rules can be crisp or fuzzy or both. But the key here is structure. Structure is the skeleton upon which a certain body of knowledge can be further expanded, refined, modified (this is why we say “dynamic”). One could say that structure forms the basis of a model or of a theory. Today there exist many ways of extracting structure from data. Statistics is one way. Building models based on data is another. But because building models and mis-handling of statistics has contributed to the destruction of a big chunk of our economy, we have invented a new method of identifying structure in data – a model-free method, which if free of statistics and building models. A method which is “natural” and un-biased.

via Ontonix – Complex Systems Management, Business Risk Management.

Identifying Hidden Structure (in Data) and Computing Knowledge


Extract taken from Ontonix Corporate website. Full article here.

 

We live in the digital age. True.  The flow of data is impressive. Statistics inform us that each year we generate more data than the past generations did in decades. But the problem is that Information Technology (IT) has concentrated on simply automating old ways of thinking, creating bottlenecks and problems we didn’t even imagine, and not really inventing new processes or approaches. There is little innovation going on in the IT arena. But one thing is certain, we are drowning in data. The problem is not simply storage (disk space is cheap). The big deal is how to extract workable knowledge out of all this data.

But what is knowledge? What is a “body of knowledge”? Setting aside ontological hair-splitting, we could say that a body of knowledge is equivalent to a structured and dynamic set of inter-related rules. The rules can be crisp or fuzzy or both. But the key here is structure. Structure is the skeleton upon which a certain body of knowledge can be further expanded, refined, modified (this is why we say “dynamic”). One could say that structure forms the basis of a model or of a theory. Today, there exist many ways of extracting structure from data. Statistics is one way. Building models based on data is another. But because building models and mis-handling of statistics has contributed to the destruction of a big chunk of our economy, we have invented a new method of identifying structure in data – a model-free method, which is free of statistics and building models. A method which is “natural” and un-biased…

"Complexity itself has become the problem": Consultant-News.com


If we are to (re)build financial resilience then it can only be done with a greater understanding of what makes a system fragile. So, I am delighted that more and more Consultancies are promoting the “complexity message”.

Although, as I have journeyed deeper into the subject, it has become clear that most of what is written about complexity theory is dense, academic and/or expensive. On the other hand, I often read or listen to consultants, ‘experts’ and media people who proffer ludicrously simplistic ‘solutions’ to complex predicaments, often without the ability to offer a clear, concise or measurable definition of complexity…not the best starting point IF considering engaging a Consultant!!!

Since it seems most people would prefer things to be simple, these ‘experts’ always seem to have an uncritical audience.  I can’t comment upon the competence of any of these firms but, I CAN say that the Ontonix approach offers a radically different and transparent solution*. Read more of this post

Improve Profitability & Reduce Risk — Thrive in a Recession [Forbes]


Feeling vindicated is pretty satisfying but being fully vindicated in print is a new level. HOWEVER, when an article appears in Forbes THAT IS SPECIAL. Then to top it all off the author name-checks Ontonix, our CTO (and Founder) and our services. WOW!!!

Let’s face it if I had written this article very few would even read it and bold claims about complexity management: increasing profitability; reducing risk; building resilience, etc. would be dismissed as “too good to be true” or marketing BS!

But, depending upon your perspective,  this is all the incentive a CxO should need to investigate the subject matter – to gain an insight into just how damaging excessive complexity is to a business OR, it is all the justification required to contact Ontonix.

It is now 3+ years since I wrote The Complexity Crisis, which sounded the “alarm” about how companies were losing profits, creating self-induced problems (with the best of intentions), while searching for growth in no-growth markets. Many companies were confusing proliferation with innovation, and overlooking hidden costs all over the place, because none of the standard accounting systems make them easy to identify. These errors have not damaged the top line (revenue) as much as the bottom line (net profit), but make no mistake about it; both have been adversely affected by unmanaged complexity. The issue now is what to do about that problem.

via Improve Profitability & Reduce Risk — Thrive in a Recession – Forbes.

Ontonix – Complexity Management & Business Risk Management


The rapid increase of turbulence of the global economy is becoming a major concern of the 21-st century. In a turbulent economy highly complex processes and organizations are difficult to manage and are inherently fragile. Therefore, high complexity becomes the main enemy of business stability and sustainability.  Furthermore, excessively complex businesses are less competitive, more vulnerable in the face of extreme events and turbulence and less  profitable. Consequently, complexity must be reduced.

We have the means to do it.

via Ontonix – Complex Systems Management, Business Risk Management.