“ERM is not enough”:: How to prepare for a Black Swan [Booz & Co]


Great to know that there are still major Consultancy firms ready and willing to wade-in to help firms understand the type of risks that could “kill” an enterprise but about which too little is widely known, less is understood and next to nothing is done to extend the current “risk horizon” or to build RESILIENCE into the Commercial/Corporate defences.

Of course the following perspective is certainly not the only one available…”Black Swans”, Systemic Risk, Complexity, Uncertainty are topics that I have covered in this blog on MANY occasions…but it is worth a read. It may answer some questions or prompt new one’s, either way, you will have given the matter further thought and, if it leads you to a more resilient enterprise, the benefits will be communicated to others…and you can thank me later!

These events can threaten a com­pany’s survival, and boards and senior leaders are responsible for protecting shareholders and other stakeholders. They must ask, What else can go wrong?

A Disrupter Analysis Stress Test

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2011 IBM Global Business Resilience and Risk Study:: cling to the wreckage of failure…or invest for the future?


imageThere isn’t much point in me, again, reiterating WHY “Corporate Resilience” [Nassim Taleb’s “antifragility”] is so important in the Digital Age! So, whilst I am slightly concerned that this report seems to infer this is more of an issue for larger firms, it is probably best I let any interested readers make their own minds up on the matter.

Traditionally, risk management tended to focus on a combination of risk transfer—achieved through insurance or other financial products—and business continuity planning to keep the organization running during a crisis. Beginning in the 1980s some companies started to develop enterprise risk management (ERM) programs building on the “circle of risk” first conceptualized in 1974 by Gustav Hamilton, risk manager of Sweden’s Statsföretag AB. The idea was to link different risk management activities such as identification, assessment, control, financing, monitoring and communication into a continuous process. In many cases, however, each element continued to operate within organizational silos.

The economic downturn beginning in 2008 triggered new interest in risk management, driving adoption of truly holistic approaches where managing risk is inherent to every decision. Today, leading organizations are pushing these concepts further to develop enterprise-wide business resilience strategies. They strive to make the ability to respond rapidly to all kinds of unexpected events—opportunities as well as threats— part of the corporate culture. This means building a business resilience strategy that engages everyone in the organization.

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