Financial meltdown:: Monopoly for 1%…Russian roulette for 99%


I am fed up watching whilst politicians, bankers, rating agencies and “the markets” play monopoly! This article (link below) refers to the UK and dates back to 17th January 2011 with links to even older items.

UK Economy: A cynic’s summary

People are realising that we are not in fact all in it together but have, instead, a kleptocracy

What has happened since then is that the stakes are higher, based upon gradual exposure of the sheer scale of bank and sovereign debt – to the purists there is a world of difference to the rest of us any distinction between banker and politician merely reflects what stage they are at in their career – as a result of, at best, mismanagement and, at worst, unadulterated systemic greed.

I was really drawn to revisit this topic because of these pithy comments from TIm Hoad taken from a long-running discussion on Linkedin: “How realistic is the prospect of any country either being pushed out of, or leaving, the Eurozone?” Read more of this post

In the world, at the limits to growth


David Korowicz tells it how he does…and that is HOW IT IS! Please search David’s name on this site or on Google for some more really insightful reading and viewing: ignorance is no excuse!!!

The reality is that we are locked into an economy adapted to growth, and that means rising energy and resource flows and waste. By lock-in, we mean that our ability to change major systems we depend upon is limited by the complexity of interdependencies, and the risk that the change will undermine other systems upon which we depend.

So we might wish to change the banking or monetary system, but if the real and dynamic consequences lead to a major bank freeze lasting more than a couple of days we will have major food security risks, massive drops in economic production, and risks to infrastructure. And if we want to make our food production and distribution more resilient to such shocks, production will fall and food prices will need to be higher, which will in the short-to-medium term drive up unemployment, lead to greater poverty, and put even greater pressure on the banking system.

via In the world, at the limits to growth | Energy Bulletin.