The Death of Taxes (or the End of Life as We Know It?) – Forbes


I can relate to the “desperation”  that is apparent in the Author’s tone!

Virtually any company I have seen, with just a little coaching and prodding, can increase their bottom line by at least a full percentage point.  Since most companies only make about 5% after tax, that one point is a 20% improvement.

And still they don’t react; they don’t change; and if they do, they do too little and only do it once.  But complexity is like weeds in a garden.  It keeps coming back again and again, and needs to be monitored, controlled and repeatedly removed.

Ironically, the systems that may fail first due to excessive complexity are not corporate systems.  They are the incredibly complex systems that we call “government.”

The Death of Taxes (or the End of Life as We Know It?) – Forbes.

Particularly in tough economic times, the opportunity to build better, more profitable and resilient enterprises, and economies, makes supreme sense. Read more of this post

Improve Profitability & Reduce Risk — Thrive in a Recession [Forbes]


Feeling vindicated is pretty satisfying but being fully vindicated in print is a new level. HOWEVER, when an article appears in Forbes THAT IS SPECIAL. Then to top it all off the author name-checks Ontonix, our CTO (and Founder) and our services. WOW!!!

Let’s face it if I had written this article very few would even read it and bold claims about complexity management: increasing profitability; reducing risk; building resilience, etc. would be dismissed as “too good to be true” or marketing BS!

But, depending upon your perspective,  this is all the incentive a CxO should need to investigate the subject matter – to gain an insight into just how damaging excessive complexity is to a business OR, it is all the justification required to contact Ontonix.

It is now 3+ years since I wrote The Complexity Crisis, which sounded the “alarm” about how companies were losing profits, creating self-induced problems (with the best of intentions), while searching for growth in no-growth markets. Many companies were confusing proliferation with innovation, and overlooking hidden costs all over the place, because none of the standard accounting systems make them easy to identify. These errors have not damaged the top line (revenue) as much as the bottom line (net profit), but make no mistake about it; both have been adversely affected by unmanaged complexity. The issue now is what to do about that problem.

via Improve Profitability & Reduce Risk — Thrive in a Recession – Forbes.