Mass elite


If we all know it makes sense why is it so difficult to apply it consistently?

Should you treat different customers differently?

There’s no doubt about it. It’s the single easiest operational way to transform your organization, by giving loyal and profitable customers a reason to come back. The danger is that your team will misunderstand the entire point of the exercise, using it as an opportunity to cut corners on the hoi polloi (who are merely elite customers who haven’t converted yet) at the same time they try to save money by investing less in the very people you set out to serve better in the first place.

Go ahead and charge extra to people who want to pay (in money or loyalty) extra. But don’t forget to give them something in return.

Seth’s Blog: Mass elite

Dawning of the day of the contrarian: consumerism lies bleeding


The signs of a gathering momentum were there to be seen (for those prepared to look) even pre-crash and I am surprised that the pace had not, significantly, accelerated since 2008. I have long argued with the “price is king” lobby within my own industry that the flight to quality was inevitableimage (the pic on the left is taken from a presentation I did in 2005/6) and would spell an inglorious end for those whose “understanding” of delivering customer value extended to some glossy marketing literature, the “hard sell” with cover, service, satisfaction and reputation compromised to achieve a cheap price.

Not only have these firms come to believe their own marketing but, in the process they have contributed greatly to the decline of the industry that spawned them. Quite apart from the reputational damage, that an industry dealing in products that are a grudge purchase, can ill-afford there is a recognised fall in Professionalism (hence Aldermanbury Declaration) and the “dumbing down” of a generation of employees and customers. Read more of this post