Ontonix:: WE have every reason to advocate transparency


The Ontonix ‘Corporate Mission’ is clear and there is no better starting point – or time to start – on the road to building a more effective and resilient business – communities – economies – world, than RIGHT NOW!

“In the past few decades we have conceived, designed and constructed extremely complex systems and infrastructures on which our lives depend to a very large degree. The list is endless but it all comes down to…

Check out this 3 minute video from Ontonix

Conventional tools and “wisdom” are inadequate for today’s Complex systems

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The FACTS that lie beyond conventional risk horizon (in graphics)


Uncertainty into usable prob

You must not become complacent with a pattern that works today because new patterns will be needed in the very near future Read more of this post

Reblog:: organizations as complex systems


A system is composed of regularly interacting or interdependent groups of activities that form a whole. A change in one aspect can affect change in other aspects.
Organizations are dynamic, living entities that have been put together to accomplish some type of purpose — they are goal oriented. The number and variety of parts to an organization can be truly astonishing. In an attempt to provide order, the organization establishes many of the rules, roles, and behaviours that individuals will and should follow to maintain their organizations. To a large extent, individuals and groups determine the development of an organization. An organization’s structure, tasks, and methods evolve out of the history of the organization’s transactions with its changing members and environment.

Applied Organizational Communication: Theory and Practice in a Global Environment
By Thomas E. Harris, Thomas E. Harris (Ph. D.), Mark D. Nelson

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Wanted: Chief Complexity Reduction Officer – Forbes


Please don’t make the mistake that Ron has identified in this article i.e. assume that he is talking about some other company! He isn’t he is talking about yours.

…If your assumption is that complexity comes largely from external factors like globalization and unexpected crises, then your only recourse is to be reactive. And when eventually things don’t go well, pegging the blame on complexity — although convenient — is a high-level form of victim mentality.

On the other hand if you acknowledge that some amount of complexity is self-generated — in the way that we structure and manage our organizations — then you can take action.

The reality is that high degrees of internal complexity significantly reduce an organization’s ability to respond effectively to complex, unanticipated events…

via Wanted: Chief Complexity Reduction Officer – Forbes.

If it wasn’t for the popular myth that the “downside of risk” is something that is exogenous [external] we would have more, better and profitable businesses; more stable economies and less volatile markets!

So, presumably, you expect some kind of justification for this statement?

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Governance–Risk–Compliance: accept responsibility to reap the rewards!


We know we can’t make reliable predictions about our environment..but it doesn’t stop us from spending enormous amounts of money to do so. Then to pay for the consequences of getting it wrong!

Introspection needs to get serious and, to do so, go beyond, “how can we improve our margins?” Apparently we don’t like to indulge in too much self-analysis, even though identifying and addressing “flaws” at source makes so much more sense. We can influence, manage or control what we do, why and how we do it. There is very little we can influence outwith our immediate environment. BusinessRisks

To put this into a business context and convey the message about how complex any business can become, consider the following table:

If this is insufficient to convince you that there are enough risks associated with behaviour to be getting on with please consider how many of these could be addressed by a robust Operational structure!

If you still have doubts, perhaps this extract, from a very interesting paper, will help. It was the result of a collaboration between US National Academies/National Research Council and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on an initiative to “stimulate fresh thinking on systemic risk”.

Catastrophic changes in the overall state of a system can ultimately derive from how it is organized — from feedback mechanisms within it, and from linkages that are latent and often unrecognized Read more of this post