Ontonix: Rating the Rating Agencies–Moody’s “A3” rating


Moody’s is the largest of the Big Three rating agencies. It employs 4500 people worldwide and has reported a revenue of $2 billion in 2010. Since rating agencies have been under heavy fire since the start of the financial meltdown – in January 2011 the Financial Crisis Inquiry Committee claimed that "The three credit rating agencies were key enablers of the financial meltdown" – we have decided to actually rate one of them. We have chosen Moody’s because today it is the largest rating agency.

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Supply chain complexity


My interest and that of my colleagues at Ontonix is “the mastery of complexity”. But it can be a difficult message to communicate to business leaders for whom the term complexity either means very little or sounds vaguely like something made up by the type of Consultants who will invent new (and scarier) threats to business just to keep them in the style to which they have become accustomed!

So, it is reassuring and extremely useful when experts from business and/or Academia use their significant influence to warn of the, very real, dangers. In his article, Supply chain futures: the mastery of complexity, Philip Greening does us – as providers of unique Complex Systems Management, Business Risk Management & Quantitative Complexity Management IT solutions – and members of the Supply Chain community an enormous favour. Read more of this post

The case for “Complexity Analysis”: Blind faith, Greek philosophy and risk


Unless you have been living in a cave you WILL be aware that the global financial sector has FAILED. It is “shot”! The models upon which the largest institutions and corporations quantified risk are discredited as are the rating agencies who wield such power over entire nations.

No-one could have seen it coming. Right?

WRONG. ABOUT AS WRONG AS YOU COULD BE!!! The warnings were out there. Not from fortune-tellers, soothsayers, prophets of doom and mad men. They, like those that relied upon their own intuition, would probably been marginalised or dismissed. But when warnings came from economists and academics you would have thought that the stakes were sufficiently high, to, at least, listen to what they had to say. NOPE. The most popular course was to ridicule what has since been shown to be the “inconvenient truth”. Read more of this post