Seth Godin:: Two questions behind every disagreement


There is no getting away from the fact that communication and consistency are critical but so is understanding. If all parties have the same goals [a common purpose] but the language is different, the means of communication unreliable or poorly structured*, the scope for progress is, seriously, hampered because the information-flow between individuals – interdependent components or processes – is impaired and vital signals can become confused or lost.
If the goals diverge, for whatever reason, the purpose may remain similar but the interdependence that is fundamental to a resilient enterprise, strategy or system is lost. This is how organisational silos can occur:
inter-connectedness is a less resilient state than interdependence.

*hierarchical structures  were NOT created to manage information in the Digital Age but to manage people and process in a past era.

Are we on the same team? and

What’s the right path forward?

Most of time, all we talk about is the path, without having the far more important but much more difficult conversation about agendas, goals and tone.

Is this a matter of respect? Power? Do you come out ahead if I fail? Has someone undercut you? Do we both want the same thing to happen here?

Read more

Interdependence:: Seth on civilization


I am a long time admirer of Seth Godin and, yet again, he doesn’t disappoint…

We don’t need more stuff. We need more civilization. More respect and more dignity. We give up a little and get a lot.

The people who create innovations, jobs, culture and art of all forms have a choice about where and how they do these things. And over and over, they choose to do it in a society that’s civilized, surrounded by people who provide them both safety and encouragement. I’m having trouble thinking of a nation (or even a city) that failed because it invested too much in taking care of its people and in creating a educated, civil society.

via Seth’s Blog: Civilization.

But, as I am sure you will have realised – if you think at all about these things and how we might begin to resolve some of the issues that blight modern society – this is hardly original thought.

Similar messages can be traced back through literature for two thousand years and, more frequently these days, are being validated by scientific analysis of the behaviour of complex systems: the most successful and resilient systems are highly INTERDEPENDENT.

More recent references can be found in, the late, Steven Covey’s famous book, “7 Habits…” but this is what Ghandi had to say on the subject…so you know he wasn’t just another person queuing up to take a pot-shot at the 99%!:

“Interdependence is and ought to be as much the ideal of man as self-sufficiency. Man is a social being. Without interrelation with society he cannot realize his oneness with the universe or suppress his egotism. His social interdependence enables him to test his faith and to prove himself on the touchstone of reality. If man were so placed or could so place himself as to be absolutely above all dependence on his fellow beings he would become so proud and arrogant as to be a veritable burden and nuisance to the world…”

The world HAS already changed: sink or survive?


Sometimes, despite my best efforts, I cannot resist sharing Seth Godin’s wisdom! This is particularly difficult when he hits on a point that I have been making time and again as I try to communicate the URGENT need for change, specifically within in Financial Services and Risk management.

Risk Leaders (Godin’s artists) and early adopters will be the “winners”…other will just have to trust to luck!

When the world changes…

It’s painful, expensive, time-consuming, stressful and ultimately pointless to work overtime to preserve your dying business model.

All the lobbying, the lawsuits, the ad campaigns and most of all, the hand-wringing, aren’t going to change anything at all. In fact, instead of postponing the outcome you fear, they probably accelerate it.

The history of media and technology is an endless series of failed rearguard actions as industry leaders attempt to solidify their positions on a bed of quicksand.

Again and again the winners are individuals and organizations that spot opportunities in the next thing, as opposed to those that would demonize, marginalize or illegalize (is that a word?) it. Breaking systems that benefit your customers is dumb. Taking money from lobbyists to break those systems is dumber still.

Let Seth inform and inspire you..

Seth Godin interview on Canadian tv

The conundrum facing insurance [courtesy of Clay Shirky]


If guys like Clay Shirky and Seth Godin “did” economics we wouldn’t be in the mess we are in now! These guys don’t think about critical issues in the conventional, College-taught, manner of an unreal world. They focus upon the world AS IT IS, AND NOT HOW WE CONVINCED OURSELVES IT WAS!

The challenge for, such as insurers, is how to embrace the lessons of the “the Digital Age” and to redesign the current, unsustainable, model. Read more of this post

“Is it better to do nothing?”


The alternative to failure, courtesy of (that man, again) Seth Godin.

It is a costly, occasionally, lonely, painful and demoralising path to tread when you are challenging, not just, the status quo but dearly held belief systems ESPECIALLY when the bases of the beliefs have been shown to be flawed, the tools and techniques inadequate for successful deployment in a changed environment…   

 

 

“What would you have me do instead?”

To the critic who decries a project as a worthless folly, something that didn’t work out, something that challenged the status quo and failed, the artist might ask,

“Is it better to do nothing?”

To the critic who hasn’t shipped, who hasn’t created his art, anything less than better-than-what-I -have-now appears to be a waste. To this critic, progress should only occur in leaps, in which a fully functioning, perfected new device/book/project/process/system appears and instantly and perfectly replaces the current model.

We don’t need your sharp wit or enmity, please. Our culture needs your support instead.

Each step by any (and every) one who ships moves us. It might show us what won’t work, it might advance the state of the art or it might merely encourage others to give it a try as well.
To those who feel that they have no choice but to create, thank you.

I’m sure it was Lord Tennyson who wrote about it being better to have loved and lost, etc. This little poem by Edgar A Guest, put things pretty well too:

‘Tis better to have tried in vain,
Sincerely striving for a goal,
Than to have lived upon the plain
An idle and a timid soul.

‘Tis better to have fought and spent
Your courage missing all applause,
Than to have lived in smug content
And never ventured for a cause.

For he who tries and fails may be
The founder of a better day;
Though never his the victory,
From him shall others learn the way