Where is your momentum for 2012 coming from?


Like in life, business momentum means increasing the things that move you forward and decreasing those that hold you back. Momentum, by its nature, requires a lot of upfront push to get the ball rolling. Here are four suggestions to jump start the momentum in your 2012 strategic planning efforts, which we think are pretty handy for applying to our own individual lives as well.

  1. Eliminate Your Energy Drains and Recharge Yourself

Energy drains are those things that drag you down. It’s this kind of friction that can rob you of making progress where it matters. Find the time to do the things that give you energy. Then stick a post-it note next to each drain you identify with an idea for getting rid of it. Then direct this newly unleashed energy to overcome inertia and get your strategic objectives on track.

  1. Conquer Your Fears—Concentrate and Be Brave
    The greatest source of procrastination is often a deep-seeded fear—fear of success, change, failure, ridicule, or even just the unknown. Take a daily step to remove your fears by asking yourself every day, “What would I do today if I was really brave?” Mark Twain once said that if the first thing you do each morning is to eat a live frog, you can go through the day with the satisfaction of knowing that that is probably the worst thing that is going to happen to you all day long. So go ahead– be brave, eat that frog and get on with your charge!
  2. Let Things Evolve
    When the flywheel of momentum starts to turn, pay attention to clues, connections and opportunities that are presented. Be aware of environmental shifts and market changes that may strengthen the guiding role a strategic plan plays during these times. Don’t plan yourself into a corner that won’t be relevant next year. Have a goal in mind, but be flexible on the process of getting there. It will make the path one that makes sense to travel.
  3. Be Committed
    No matter what your organizational goals are, or how difficult they’ll be to achieve, maintaining momentum requires commitment. Be committed to the strategic management process, as it takes new habits to reference and incorporate long-term considerations into day-to-day actions. Be diligent and have patience, because like anything of importance, strategic achievements require a proper cycle for fulfilment.

– Copy adapted from Strategic Planning for Dummies, which was written by Erica Olsen

Adaptability: The New Competitive Advantage


Geary Sikich quoteNo wonder many of C-level Exec’s and institutions, that thrived in the industrial era, are “failing” in the Digital Age, when so much of what they held dear and used as justification for excessive remuneration and bonus packages, have been shown to be deeply flawed: economics; financial and risk management. Some do claim that they are now looking to “innovate” their way toward a brighter future but the evidence suggests that their idea of i-nnovation is more about re-packaging the same old “win/lose” propositions: destructive creation!

What IS required is the type of “creative destruction” that benefits stakeholders and leads to “win/win”: now that is I-nnovation that customers can understand and embrace. Alternatively, customers will look for VALUE from new entrants to a given marketplace…whether these be new players (without legacy issues) or established players from emerging markets. Read more of this post

SWOT analyses: Complex “heart” surgery can’t take months


It doesn’t matter whether it is a business YOU have built from scratch over many years; if it is a business turnaround; introducing Enterprise Risk Management; Corporate Process Management; Operational review, etc. getting to the heart of a complex business is a notoriously slow, painful and potentially costly process.

Financial data will provide little, as it is probably the reason why an exercise is being undertaken!

Qualitative feedback comes with a “tainted” perspective – whether top down or bottom-up – and can say more about the scale of the problem than it does about its nature.

Silos can be difficult to “get inside” or break down.

Buy-in is a whole different ball-game!!!

CHANGE MANAGEMENT ain’t easy and “time is money” that, often, can be ill-afforded.

One sure-fire way of getting insight, that is otherwise unavailable and provides an objective [100% quantitative] is a Complexity Analysis from Ontonix.

SO, if someone tells you “all I want is the best for the business” and that they, their role or their division “…are part of the solution, not the problem” you can test that out by mapping the interdependencies, strengths and weaknesses within the organisation.

Once you measure the health of the system you have a basis for sound, verifiable, decisions that are geared to maintaining, managing or improving the health of the business for its stakeholders.

WITHOUT measurement the complexity of the organisation may be compounded by that of the task: rendering projected timescales, improvements, savings and meaningful (sustainable) change, ineffective OR able, only to be assessed in terms of random outcomes…pot luck!

Good luck with that!

However, if you want to eliminate as much of the uncertainty and risk from these processes as is possible, I would be happy to hear from you. The Ontonix technology is unique: rigorously tested; reliable; effective; quantifiable; verifiable and, depending upon the size of the task, considerably cheaper that deploying a competent person.

Quantitative SWOT analysis Most people in business will have had, at least, a “brush” with an analysis of: STRENGTHS; WEAKNESSES; OPPORTUNITIES; THREATS (SWOT). Done properly, it can be a very useful tool. It can bring focus to key issues for the business to consider, can contribute much to strategic planning, change management and, even, negotiations…EVEN THOUGH, WHEN CARRIED OUT IN-HOUSE, IT IS SUBJECTIVE AND QUALITATIVE! Imagine how POWERFUL it would be if it was: OBJ … Read More

via Get “fit for randomness” [with Ontonix UK]

Quantitative SWOT analysis


Most people in business will have had, at least, a “brush” with an analysis of: STRENGTHS; WEAKNESSES; OPPORTUNITIES; THREATS (SWOT).

Done properly, it can be a very useful tool. It can bring focus to key issues for the business to consider, can contribute much to strategic planning, change management and, even, negotiations…EVEN THOUGH IT IS SUBJECTIVE AND FAILS TO TAKE ACCOUNT OF THE CURRENT ‘HEALTH’ OF THE BUSINESS SYSTEM!

Imagine how POWERFUL it would be if it was: OBJECTIVE; QUANTITATIVE; MEASURABLE; VERIFIABLE and so much more…. Read more of this post