M.A.D.: The $600 Trillion Time Bomb – Money Morning


My learned colleagues, at Ontonix, recently undertook the task of analysing over 600 macro-economic  parameters from the World Bank for the period from 1970 to 2010 and posed the question: “how much globalisation can the World afford”?

This may seem to be a curious course for a firm whose Founder and CTO is quick to quote Zadeh’s Principle of Incompatibility but should be viewed in the context of a genuine desire to “educate and inform”…and, of course, to showcase Ontonix capabilities!

Read on because “high precision” may not be required. A rough idea of the numbers and the implications should suffice! Read more of this post

Ontonix:: how much globalisation can the World afford?


макет вращающейся планеты Земля, формат - &quo...

Image via Wikipedia

How much globalisation can the World digest? Have we reached the limit? What is the limit, if any? Is globalisation piloted and induced, or is it just a spontaneous and inevitable result of economic (and human) development? These are not easy questions to tackle. However, with the aid of complexity – which is a meta-KPI combining a multitude of conventional indicators into a single scalar measure – we can gain insight into the dynamics of globalisation. Based on data from the World Bank, we have measured and analysed the evolution of complexity of the World as a system. The analysis (see the end of this blog for a complete list of parameters) has embraced 600+ parameters, spanning the period 1970-2010 and covering the following facets of our global society:

Read more of this post

Ontonix:: when Will the USA Collapse?


The European Union is in a state of evident and (possibly) irreversible demise. The first and most prominent reflection of this is the weakness of the Euro which we have recently forecasted to "dissolve" around Q3 of 2013. Once the common currency is gone, the union will probably transform into something else that is easier to manage, less complex, less heterogeneous. The structural resilience of the EU as a system has been very low (1 on a scale from 1 to 5) since November 2010 and this is certainly not a good omen.

Recently we have turned our attention to the US. Employing data from the World Bank we have rated the country as a system, incorporating into the analysis over 800 parameters spanning:

  • Economy
  • Industry
  • Agriculture
  • Energy
  • Society
  • Ecosystem
  • Transportation
  • Telecommunications
  • Military/Defence
  • Education
  • Health System
  • etc. Read more of this post