World Economic Forum:: New Models of Leadership–John Maeda

John Maeda is President of the Rhode Island School of Design and is a Member of the Global Agenda Council on New Models of Leadership.

As far as I can recall, I first came across the name of John Maeda from this beautifully succinct quote:

“Openness simplifies complexity”

A decent introduction to anyone, I think you’ll agree. Particularly when you have spent years trying to convey the need for and merits of TRANSPARENCY; the costs associated with AMBIGUITY and risks created by excessive COMPLEXITY.

John Maeda is President of the Rhode Island School of Design and is a Member of the Global Agenda Council on New Models of Leadership.

Discussions this year from the Global Agenda Council on New Models of Leadership culminated in a white paper, which describes a set of competencies for leaders in the 21st century. A central thesis of our work is the need for leaders to be agile in what are increasingly volatile and complex times.

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Insurance:: “Future risk” and technology [CII report]


image30 yeas ago (and for much of the intervening period!) I never thought I would utter the words, “what a great report from CII” but there you are, I’ve done it now. I’m the “sad” insurance man I never wanted to be.

Well, not quite, because I am very much an outsider as far as the insurance industry stands right now. The main reason being that too many people on the inside don’t want to hear, like or understand what I have to say about the massive problems that the industry is adding to day, after day, after…

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The role of government in a crowdsourcing world:: World Economic Forum

This isn’t about the future this is about NOW! How are you contributing and how prepared are you to deal with the next phase of the “great unwinding”?

Not sure? Ontonix can tell you, drop me an email or follow the link.

Indeed, as access to information increases and the cost of collaboration decreases, so too does our dependency on governments to manage complexity. As a result, a newly empowered civil society is reclaiming its rightful place between governments and free markets as a viable alternative that is capable of solving big problems.

Even when the DNA is similar “we can’t fix today’s problems with yesterday’s tools”:: Part 1

This quote is from David Cole (Chief Risk Officer, Swiss Re) and, needless to say, he wasn’t talking about fixing his 30 year old VW Golf! He was actually talking about our current “economic ills” and the quote appeared in relation to the 2012 Global Risks report from WEF…but the Principle readily applies to both.

Circa 35 years ago, the engine of a popular family vehicle was a complicated machine, that could be maintained, faults identified, performance improved and mechanical repairs undertaken, even at roadside, by an enthusiastic amateur. Observation, diagnosis or intervention at the appropriate stage in the process was possible. However, in a relatively short period of time, these machines have evolved into highly complex systems. The complexity is such that, even a skilled motor mechanic armed with 30+ years knowledge and tools that have changed little, can be rendered helpless.

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World Economic Forum:: digital information structure and risk resilience

More critical thinking from WEF. Instead of existing “apart from” digital networks, the “semantic web” is as much apart of us as we are of it! I don’t expect universal agreement but how truly independent are we? How much of what we rely upon, as individuals and businesses, could we do without if we don’t have access to cash to buy food, communications and global logistics?

Understanding and embracing INTERDEPENDENCE would be a good start. After all that is what makes the difference between successful and resilient complex systems and those that are inter-connected but fragile due to ineffective [ambiguous] communications: collaboration not competition. Read more of this post